Cartoons

Cartoons

 

Materials: comic strips, cartoons, pictures from books

The Sunday newspaper typically has a wide selection of comic strips and cartoons. Ask students to bring in comics that relate to particular Habits of a Systems Thinker, or as the teacher, you can share a cartoon and ask students to select a habit that connects to the message of the comic. After reading or reviewing the comic or cartoon ask,

  • Which habits are illustrated in each comic or in each cartoon?
  • Which habits would help the character(s) featured in the comic or cartoon?
  • Would any of the habits help characters make better choices or better decisions?

For each question, ask students to identify specific habits and explain their choices.

 

Cartoon






Goal-Setting

Goal-Setting

 

Materials: A set of Habits of a Systems Thinker cards for each person or the View the Cards section of the app and goal gap planning sheet

Ask each individual to set a goal that he or she would like to work toward that is both realistic and achievable. Introduce the goal and gap balancing loop. Ask students to fill in the goal and gap planning sheet. Ask students to consider both strategies for improvement and the habits of systems thinking that would help them improve.

Questions to ask related to the habits:

  • Which 2 or 3 habits will help you work toward achieving your goal?
  • How will you know you are moving toward your goal?
  • What would you expect to see or feel as you move closer to achieving your goal?

View/Download Blank Handout

goal






Self-Assessment

Self-Assessment
The Habits and Me

Materials: A set of Habits of a Systems Thinker cards or the View the Cards section of the app for each person

Using the habits cards, read over each card and place each in one of three different piles:

  • Habits that you understand and consciously practice on a daily basis – “I can give an example of this habit and explain how I put this habit into action.”
  • Habits that you understand, yet need practice using them on a daily basis – “I can give an example of this habit and describe why I need more practice.”
  • Habits that you do not fully understand – “I cannot think of an example of this habit and I need someone to explain what it means.”

With a partner or small group, share examples from pile 1 and tell a story that illustrates this habit as a personal strength.

With a partner or small group, share examples from pile 2 and tell a story that illustrates this habit as an area of growth.

After small group sharing, re-examine pile 3 to see if any can be moved to pile 1 or pile 2.

piles






Sculpture

Sculpture

 

Materials: chenille stems, modeling clay, scraps of colored paper, markers, found objects and/or art supplies

Choose a habit that you think is particularly important or significant to your role or a situation that you care about.

Create a sculpture that represents what the habit means to you. Be ready to explain your sculpture to others. Encourage creativity, and either abstract or realistic representations.

Example Sculpture 1 Complex cause and effect

“This is an abstract example of multiple interconnecting circles. Move one circle and they will all react by either falling down or shifting.”

cause-effect

Example Sculpture 2 Long and short-term consequences

“If it looks like it might rain, I take along my umbrella, even though it is a pain to carry it around. In the long run the burden of carrying the umbrella pays off. Notice the dry person with the yellow umbrella who considered long-term consequences, and the wet figure who didn’t want to be bothered with an umbrella!”

Long and short-cropped1

Example Sculpture 3 Observing elements change over time

“This is a simple image of a clock. So often in school I pay too much attention to what students are doing now, rather than the noticeable trends of how they have improved over time. Images of clocks and calendars help me be better with this habit.”

Change over time-cropped1

Example Sculpture 4 Change perspectives and seek the big picture

“In this four part sculpture, I wanted to show how the view you take determines what you see. Scene one has the smallest frame so that you can only see a part of a tree. By gradually increasing the size of the frame, you can eventually see more of the tree and the neighboring trees in the forest.”

 

tree1

tree2

 

tree3

tree4






Stories

Stories

Materials: Picture books (e.g. Chicken Little, Johnny Appleseed) and a set of Habits of a Systems Thinker cards or the View the Cards section of the app

After reading a story, children choose which habits connect with what they have read.

Questions to ask:

  • Which habits did characters practice during the story?
  • Can you give an example?
  • Which habits would have helped characters make better choices?
  • Using a habit that you think would be helpful, what advice would you give a character?

johnny






Thinking Wall

Thinking Wall

Materials: Blank wall space and Habits of a Systems Thinker posters or the equivalent

Choose one habit and post it on the Thinking Wall. (Example Wall 1) Ask students to discuss the habit by asking,

  • What’s one explanation of this habit?
  • What’s an example of this habit?
  • What happens when people forget to use this habit?
  • Why is this habit important?

Establish a time frame for contributing to the Thinking Wall for the Habit of choice (suggested time – one week)

Ask students to bring in examples and non-examples of the habit to post on the Thinking Wall. Examples might include newspaper articles, photos, artwork, cartoons, letters, poems, song lyrics, etc.

At the end of the week, schedule a sharing time when students can ask about items posted on the Wall and discuss how the items help describe why the habit is important.

Example Wall 1:

wall1

Example Wall 2:

A variation in which the teacher posted multiple habits for the students to respond to over time.

wall2






Conflict Resolution

Conflict Resolution

 

Materials: A set of Habits of a Systems Thinker cards or the View the Cards section of this app; a copy of the escalation archetype 

Examples:

If studying or dealing with a conflict that results from an escalating situation (e.g. power struggles, jealousy), ask students to use the Escalation archetype to tell the story of the conflict.

Questions to ask:

  • Which habits help avoid escalating conflict?
  • Which habits help resolve conflict?
  • Which habits help people in conflict understand the other person’s point of view?
  • Which habits will help the most when interacting with others?
  • What changes in behavior might result from applying these habits?


Misunderstanding that causes conflict: When a conflict exists because of a misunderstanding or miscommunication-

Questions to ask:

  • Which habits could help people avoid misunderstandings?
  • Which habits better help people understand another’s point of view?
  • Which habits will help the most when interacting with others?
  • What changes in behavior might result from applying these habits?